Saving for retirement is a problem for some Americans.

Many consumers trying to rectify their financial plan may be struggling with their retirement finances, among other issues. This can be a problem, but may take some extra care to ensure their strategy improves.

Close to 55 percent of Americans have not changed their retirement savings contribution in the past year, according to a report from Bankrate.com. However, 17 percent cut their savings levels, while nearly the same amount are saving more. Despite the issue with consumers saving a lesser amount of money, the figure was lower than in 2011, when nearly 30 percent slowed their savings contributions.

“This is troubling considering the availability of catch-up contributions for those 50 and up, as well as the higher 2013 contribution limits for all eligible IRA and 401(k) contributors,” said Greg McBride, senior financial analyst at Bankrate.com.

Even with some problems for consumers, when it came to saving for retirement, there were positives present. The company explained that its Financial Security Index dropped to 100.5 during July, but the figure was still relatively positive. This was due to it still being higher than 100, which is the level on the index that determines what is positive and what is negative. Improving figures were recorded for the past six months.

Consumers worry about finances while at the office
Many people may be dealing with financial issues that vary widely, and this could be affecting their performance at work. This can be difficult, as it may leave them distracted at times they look to focus.

Nearly 30 percent of consumers noted they spend some amount of time trying to deal with their financial situation during the time they are at work, a report from Purchasing Power noted. Close to half of those are worrying about it for two to three hours each week.

“Stress over money takes both a mental and physical toll on workers, impacting health-related costs and reducing productivity by a significant number,” said Richard Carrano, president and CEO of Purchasing Power. “Employees’ financial problems become the employer’s problems as well.”

More than 40 percent of those polled noted that they are concerned about their financial strategy while dealing with their work, the report added. Close to the same percentage of that group also explained their financial concentration can last for two to three hours during their work week.

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